Everything should always line up. It never fails that at least one of your joist is right in the middle of a toilet drain. There are four things to consider when laying out a wall: load path, the location of intersecting walls, window and door openings and the king and jack (or trimmer) studs that outline their rough openings, and the common studs. When you are finished m… And if the stud location is under a window then change your x to a j for jack. Mind you, if you use engineered floor joist, have a peek at the layout and match your starting point with the joist lay out. It can be the left or right corner. Eliminate … Whenever one of the studs ends up or almost ends up on one of your previous marked items you can omit this stud. How To Lay Out Walls, Floors, and Roofs | Explaining Layout Pick a corner of your house and lay out everything from that corner. Usually a few inches will make a difference. Next layout all the windows and doors in your wall. Of course there is a bit more to laying out a building for framing but this makes a good start. Pick a corner of your house and lay out everything from that corner. Do the same for the side wall starting at the same corner. When you are finished with the first floor all the studs should line up. wall framing.). If you have any bearing points in your wall section, mark those out on your plates next. After you are all done it will look something like the above. Once the stock is loaded and ready to go, two crew members start laying out plates on opposite sides of the house (to stay out of each others way). With the floor joist layout you will have to make sure that the joist are not located under toilet, tub or shower drains. Next layout all the windows and doors in your wall. Start your stud layout from the corner you picked and mark the first stud at 15 1/4" on the wall plates and proceed from there on at 16" centers with your layout. They take measurements directly from the wall layout before measuring and cutting the plates to length. Wood Framing Basics: Snap lines and set the plates in place. If you have any bearing points in your wall section, mark those out on your plates next. Watch this step-by-step video about laying out stud walls, and check out “Building Skills” in issue # 274 for more. Start the layout for the studs on the second floor from exactly the same location as the first floor. The most common layout for wall studs is 16 inches on center. If you don't start your layout from the same point for exterior and interior walls, unless you are lucky, you could end up with something like this, creating all kinds of problems for heating ducts and plumbing stacks to run through the walls plus it looks like crap. Mark the layout on the floor. Walls in cooler climates are built with 2x6 framing and in warmer climates they are built with 2x4 framing. Continue the layout from these studs all through the house. (Start first stud at 23 1/4" for 24" O.C. Joist that are in the way of those items should be moved as much as needed. Building codes require that exterior walls be sheated with plywood or oriented strand board, OSB. Start your floor joist layout from the same location. This is not only good practice, but will make life much easier for the plumbing and the heating. When you are finished marking out the previous items it is time to layout the wall for the stud locations. Convert Feet/Inches/Fractions to Decimal Format. Of course there is a bit more to laying out a building for framing but starting your layouts from one point throughout the house for all walls, joist and trusses not only makes sense, it will also end up less messy after everything is said an done. Start your layout with marking out all the partition walls. It can be the left or right corner. Mind you, if you use engineered floor joist, have a peek at the layout and match your starting point with the joist lay out. Framing exterior walls is different from interior walls. Framing exterior walls of a home happens immediately after the floor is framed. Start your layout with marking out all the partition walls.